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A Race Horse Herbal

     This site is the precursor to my literary/scientific text, A Racehorse Herbal. I am a racehorse contrarian not only on how to medically treat racehorses, but how they should be trained and raced. This book will provide a comprehensive study of old timey training/racing methods and remedies as compared to the modern trends found in the horse industry of both the Standardbred and Thoroughbred. It will allow the race horseman to utilize and integrate common medicinal plants and holistic techniques into his everyday regime of keeping his animals fit and racing. He will be able to identify and process ignored weeds into useful, cost effective and unique remedies. This text will not only review modern herbal research as it applies to equine performance injuries and stress but, at the same time, never dismiss the relevance of many cures successfully proven by centuries of past folk usage or by the work of long extinct renegade researchers. It will, also, review traditional Veterinary equine therapeutics from the past, delve into the herbal teachings of Samuel Thomson (the Thomsonian Medical movement of the 1800s), Cincinnati's Eclectic Movement of the late 19th century, John Uri Lloyd's 20th century botanical contributions to that movement, and apply all relevant treatments to the modern racehorse. The herbal genius of Dr. John Christopher and Dr. Richard Schulze which are themselves products of the earlier mentioned movements, will be interwoven into this therapeutic tapestry. This site contains excerpts from my text and should provide the reader with the flavor and the practical value of A Racehorse Herbal.

     I think you will find the pages contained in this site unique, and I know you will find my proposed herbal text different and eye-opening. My writings will not just be regurgitated herbal medicine gleamed from past texts before me as often seems to be the custom of modern works. Lynn Margulis writes:"The efficiencies of specialization bring mixed results. Although effective for organization of numerous individuals, specialization separates us from our sense of the whole." Our modern life and our view of veterinary medicine has become so complex that no one can remain familiar with very many multi-specialized fields without ultimately tending to lose sight of the whole. I want to see the whole and not be myopic! I have spent too much of my life in the very specialized field of simply training racehorses without learning much about how and why they are as they are. How they heal as they do. This text will delve into many multiple fields and try to grasp some resemblance of the truth on why things are as they are. I love thinking out of the box and applying principles shown to be valuable in other disciplines to that of the racing horse. Publication date projected to be in 2015. May this web site open the eyes of performance horsemen and horsewomen to new thoughts, new treatments, and a better understanding of conditioning programs. Enjoy, learn, be inspired upon this knowledge, but mostly------ win races.


     As a United States  Midwesterner, I have long since lost my admiration for American modern training & racing trends. It is all go-go with little development of stamina and horsemanship. I look across the Atlantic for inspiration in conditioning a route horse where the Brits have kept their priorities alive in breeding and racing horses tough enough to go a distance. The Grand National at Aintree is an example of such thinking and doing!

Look to Betbright betting for your wagering needs at that great event and track!


      Your author galloping a promising green three year old that has only had a few days on the track at Canterbury Downs in Minnesota. Accordingly, my irons are set a bit long, the youngster's stable halter is left on under the bridle--just in case she gets loose from me,  and I am trying to anticipate a quick shy. So far, so good. . . . .

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